Sunday Monday Tuesday Program at a Glance

This year's IIBEC/OBEC BES will have 20 concurrent plus 2 general sessions, all featuring cutting-edge, relevant solutions for design, construction, below-grade waterproofing, restoration, sustainability, and building enclosure commissioning. More details regarding the education will be coming soon.

Presentation Classification Codes

Air Barriers: AB
Building Commissioning: BECxP
Building Enclosure: BE
Building Enclosure Technology: BET
Business/Professional Development: BPD

Codes & Standards: C&S
Exterior Wall: EW
Leak Detection: LD
Restoration: RS
Roofing: R
Waterproofing: WP
Wind: W
Safety: S
Sustainability: SUS

 

 

Sunday, September 29

6:00 p.m.- 7:00 p.m.: Evening Reception
Sponsored by Johns Manville


Monday, September 30

Best Practices for a Successful Natatorium Enclosure

10:15am – 11:15am

Jonathan Smegal, MASc, PEng

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/Elective. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Exterior Wall: EW, Case Studies: CST

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Identify high-risk enclosure details for air leakage and best practice air barrier system strategies.
  • Identify key high-level HVAC design requirements.
  • Verify building operation pressures by measurement and calculation.
  • Explain the main causes of natatorium building failures in cold climates.

Description
The indoor environment of natatoriums, or indoor pools, is typically characterized by elevated air temperatures and relative humidity levels. In climates with cool-to-cold winters, outdoor temperatures frequently drop below the dewpoint of the indoor environment. Where air leakage occurs, condensation can form within the enclosure leading to premature failure of the building fabric. Failures can manifest as rot/decay of the building and include structural elements, damage to finishes, dripping on the interior, corrosion of exposed metal, excessive condensation on glazing surfaces, etc. This session considers existing natatorium design guidance and identifies several areas where further clarification and additional guidance is warranted. A series of forensic investigation case studies is presented and patterns are identified: moisture issues in natatoriums are typically related to some combination of inadequate air control at the enclosure and/or interior partition walls, poorly controlled or improper building pressure fields, mechanical system inadequacies, or thermal bridging. This session will present a summary of the science- and experience-based best practice recommendations for the successful design and construction of natatorium enclosures for both commercial and residential use. It is intended for architects doing the design and general contractors responsible for the construction.

Presenter/Author

Jonathan Smegal, MASc, PEng

Associate, Senior Building Science Consultant
RDH Building Science Inc.

Based in Waterloo, Ontario, for nearly 20 years, Jonathan Smegal is an associate and senior building science consultant at RDH. He leads projects related to laboratory research, forensic analysis of building failures, litigation, hygrothermal modeling, and field monitoring of building enclosure performance. As a researcher, he is an author on multiple peer-reviewed papers and has frequently shared his work through industry publications, webinars, and speaking events.
 

The History of Roofing in One Building Since the 1970s—Actually!

10:15am – 11:15am

Jean-Guy Levaque, F-IIBEC, RRC, RRO, Arch Technologist

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Research & Technology: R&T, Roofing: R, Case Studies: CST

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Discuss important milestones throughout the history of roofing since the 1970s.
  • Identify key elements of roof systems, roof evaluations and assessments, and report presentations to clients.
  • Self-evaluate present practice in roof assessments and decision-making processes on replacement of roofs.
  • Recognize challenges in the analysis of multiple parameters to attain a final recommendation.

Description
Imagine that there is a commercial building out there that has encapsulated a good part of the history of roofing since the 1970s! We have discovered this building in Canada and will present a case study to look at this extraordinary example of roof life management, highlighting the various roof system types, the roof renewal processes that took place, and the positive and negative impact that decision-making processes have had on the performance of the building. 
We will discuss the process of roof condition assessment information gathering and analysis of the roof systems in place. Finally, we will outline the findings of tests completed and the steps that are now being carried out to address the long-term issues. 
Our findings will confirm what many people face today with commercial type buildings across Canada. These buildings have long outlived their original intended service life and now are needing extensive repairs, making the lessons it offers invaluable to consultants and owners alike. 

Presenter/Author

Jean-Guy Levaque, F-IIBEC, RRC, RRO, Arch Technologist

Pretium Engineering Inc.
 

As a specialist roofing consultant with more than 42 years of construction experience and more than 34 years of roof consulting expertise, Jean-Guy Levaque has been providing valuable and practical solutions to high-profile national clients for existing building retrofit and new construction projects. A fluently bilingual consultant, he has an in-depth knowledge of the roofing industry and is widely recognized throughout Canada, the US, and internationally. Levaque strives to understand the needs of clients, and is dedicated to providing the best solutions, with integrity and honesty. 

Blindside Waterproofing Systems for Hydrostatic Conditions: Lessons Learned & Good Practices

11:20am – 12:20pm

Chris McConnell, B.Tech

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/Elective. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Restoration: RS, Below Grade/Waterproofing: BGWP, Case Studies: CST

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Identify available waterproofing materials for blindside bathtub waterproofing systems.
  • Discuss perimeter foundation wall construction techniques and their implications on the selection of the appropriate blindside bathtub waterproofing systems.
  • Identify blindside bathtub waterproofing systems for best performance results based on construction challenges (pre-emptive versus reactive).
  • Explain the impacts of failure of the blindside bathtub waterproofing system, either due to construction practices or material selection.
  • Explore available options to resolve localized and systemic water leakage after installation.

Description
In densely populated areas and where hydrostatic conditions exist, particularly near large bodies of water, fully encapsulated blindside waterproofing system applications, otherwise called “bath tubbing” has become a common practice. As such, minimal standards exist for the performance of typical blindside waterproofing systems on a new construction project, let alone the more challenging “bathtub” application. A comprehensive approach is warranted in the selection and installation of waterproofing systems with consideration of construction challenges, performance requirements, and available options. With the use of alternative construction techniques, such as shotcrete in lieu of poured-in-place concrete, different challenges are experienced that require appropriate additional measures to reduce the risk of water leakage issues. This session presents the lessons learned from successful projects and projects with leakage issues, construction practices, and detailing of the waterproofing system. The presentation will also discuss the findings from stand-alone mock-ups and follow-up testing conducted prior to the construction. Designers, consultants, and constructors will benefit from the session by better appreciating the challenges, risks, proper installation procedures, and mitigation measures in addressing failures of blindside bathtub waterproofing, and thus propagating knowledge toward long-term performance.

Presenter/Author

Chris McConnell, B.Tech

Team Lead – Building Envelope Rehabilitation
EXP Services Inc.

Over his 10-years-plus career, Chris Mconnell, B.Tech, has gained experiences in a wide variety of fields and disciplines, including custom house design, general contracting, and consulting services related to noise, vibration, new construction, concrete rehabilitation, façade restoration, and waterproofing problem solving. He provides services to several types of clients in the commercial, industrial, and residential sectors, including services across Canada where he liaises with other EXP offices and manages the team remotely for highly successful projects. He is a graduate of McMaster University, where he finished summa cum laude in his Bachelor of Technology course.
 

 

Decarbonizing Building Materials: Exploring the Embodied Carbon of Structure and Enclosure Systems

2:00pm – 3:00pm

Sean Moore, SEBT, LEED AP BD+C

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Sustainability/Resilience: SUS 

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Describe the process of embodied carbon reporting, including ISO 14040/1404, TRACI, and other life cycle assessment methodologies.
  • Discuss practical strategies for reducing the environmental footprint of buildings through the selection of low-carbon building materials, which can be implemented in their projects immediately.
  • Explain how the application of industry standards, such as the Toronto Green Standard, LEED, and CaGBC Zero Carbon Design enables informed decisions aligned with sustainability goals.
  • Explore methods to mitigate embodied carbon emissions to drive positive change within the construction industry.

Description
This session will explore the crucial role of engineers, architects, and design team members in the selection of low-carbon building materials to alleviate the environmental impact of both new and existing structures. A comprehensive overview of industry standards for LCA reporting, including ISO 14040 to 14044 Environmental Management, TRACI, Upfront Embodied Carbon, and Absolute Embodied Carbon Intensity, will be discussed. This session is designed to equip design and construction teams with the knowledge needed to effectively implement LCA processes, thereby contributing to local and global efforts to combat climate change. By focusing on standards such as the Toronto Green Standard, LEED, and CaGBC Zero Carbon Design, attendees will gain detailed insights into material selection and decision-making processes. Furthermore, practical solutions for reducing a building’s environmental footprint will be presented. This session is essential for architects, engineers, contractors, and sustainability consultants seeking guidance with aligning their decisions with sustainability objectives. By exploring practical methods to mitigate carbon emissions, participants will position themselves to play an active and influential role in driving positive change within the construction industry.

Presenter/Author

Sean Moore, SEBT, LEED AP BD+C

Project Manager – Energy & Carbon Reduction Team
Pretium Engineering Inc.

Biography
Sean Moore is a solution-oriented sustainability professional with 10 years of experience in sustainability consulting with a specialization in building material selection and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). He has collaborated with interdisciplinary teams to implement innovative design and construction solutions across various building types. Sean's expertise in LEED certification, net zero carbon design, carbon and energy optimization has guided projects to meet the highest levels of sustainable building and performance standards. Sean’s deep commitment to environmental stewardship has played a pivotal role in advancing the integration of sustainable practices within the built environment.
 

Airtightness Ultimate Benefits and Decisive Stakeholders’ Interests

2:00pm – 3:00pm

Ehab Naim Ibrahim, BArch, Dipl Ing Architekt, MRAIC, BSS®, LEED® AP, CPHD; Meena Hamati, Ing (Eng), MEng, PQS

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Knowledge Level: Advanced
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/Elective. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Building Commissioning: BECxP, Codes & Standards: C&S, Sustainability/Resilience: SUS

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Discuss developing codes and standards.
  • Compare energy conservation objectives.
  • Interpret parameters, measuring tools, and correspondences evaluation. 
  • Manage authorities, builders, and public expectations. 
  • Explore enabling feasibilities to achieve aimed performance.

Description
Airtightness is an impactful dynamic toward reduced energy consumption, occupant comfort, and building resilience at large. Disclosed building energy use intensity (EUI) operational data is alarming. In times where our expertise should unite to conquer this air and energy leakage beast, air permeability expectations from distinct components and buildings are ultimately blurred and are often deranged. Although anticipated conservation targets appear mostly clear while initiating projects, whole-building airtightness performance and resulting energy exhaustion declare major misperceptions in applied methodologies. Many construction stakeholders aren’t necessarily proceeding in harmony. Designers, developers, and legislative entities confuse requirements and standards. To build a truly airtight building, it's important to plan carefully and use tools to find and seal up any gaps during construction. This can help us cut down on wasted energy. The research presented intends to clarify construction’s most employed airtightness approaches, those in light of stockholders’ diverse interests and contributions toward achieving a certain enclosure performance. The analyses will include commonalities and differences between predominant standards and testing parameters, as well as subsequent energy consumptions/savings. The aimed airtightness study will help minimize confusion and propose practical paths forward with relevant stakeholders’ interests, arriving at sustainability.

Presenter/Author

Ehab Naim Ibrahim, BArch, Dipl Ing Architekt, MRAIC, BSS®, LEED® AP, CPHD

Building Physics Consultant

Ehab Naim Ibrahim focuses on building envelope improvements, developing innovative solutions, and establishing nontraditional facade concepts. He joined Gamma in 2019 after 25 years with WSP and other Canadian and German consulting and architectural firms. He is a  member of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, has served as the president of the Ontario Building Envelope Council (OBEC, 2020 – 2021), and is a guest lecturer, design studio assistant, and critic at the University of Toronto school of Architecture master’s program. He is the registered inventor of the patented first North American Passivhaus Certified Unitized Curtainwall.

Co-Author

Meena Hamati, Ing (Eng), MEng, PQS

Meena Hamati has worked with building envelope contractors in Canada and internationally for more than 10 years. He is an engineer certified by the Order of Engineers of Quebec and a professional quantity surveyor member of the Canadian Institute of Quantity Surveyors. He holds a master’s degree in building engineering.
 

 

Thermal Performance of Spandrel Assemblies in Glazed Wall Systems

3:05pm – 4:05pm

Cheryl Saldanha, Ivan Lee, Daniel Haaland 

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/Elective. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Research & Technology: R&T, Codes & Standards: C&S, Fenestration/Glazing


Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Identify the limitations of current thermal simulation methods for spandrel assemblies.
  • Evaluate the impact of ventilation in spandrel assemblies.
  • Discuss the experimental setup for performing laboratory testing.
  • Compare laboratory test results to thermal simulation results.

DescriptionWhile the thermal performance calculation of discrete vision areas in curtainwall and window wall systems is well understood, when combined with opaque spandrels, it often stretches the limits of common evaluation methods. Recently published spandrel simulation procedures continue to struggle with nonstandard sizes, especially small slab bypass units with high frame to center-of-spandrel ratios; heat flow from adjacent assemblies (vision glazing and building components such as walls, floors, and roofs); and evaluation of interior temperatures, particularly near corners and framing intersections. As a result, there is confusion and inconsistent results in spandrel thermal performance values. Several studies show that conventional 2D thermal simulations may overestimate R-values by 30% compared to physical testing or 3D simulations.  This presentation summarizes ongoing research that includes literature review, simulations, and laboratory testing. The research objective is to develop improved thermal simulation techniques that more accurately represent the thermal behavior of spandrel assemblies and its integration with the building envelope. We appreciate the RCI-IIBEC Foundation for contributing to this research.

Presenter/Author

Cheryl Saldanha, PE, CPHD

Senior Project Manager, Building Science Practice Leader
Simpson Gumpertz and Heger

Cheryl Saldanha specializes in designing and evaluating building enclosures for new projects and existing building enclosure renovations. She is adept at using multiple simulation tools for thermal, condensation, whole-building energy, and daylighting analyses. She co-chaired the NYC Chapter of the International Building Performance Simulation Association and participated on the NYC Commercial Energy Code Technical Advisory Committee. She has authored technical papers and lectured on topics ranging from embodied and operational carbon of facades, thermal bridging calculations, energy modeling, and condensation issues in building enclosure systems. Cheryl was awarded Building Design + Construction magazine’s Top 40 under 40 for 2022.

 

Ivan Lee, PEng

Morrison Hershfield

With over 14 years of experience, Ivan Lee, P.Eng., is the leader of the Component Modelling Team, focusing on hygrothermal and thermal modeling. He applies his background in building science and modeling to evaluate the performance of building assemblies. Using 2D and 3D thermal simulations, he evaluates thermal bridging and condensation risks in building assemblies to establish effective thermal performance of the building envelope for manufacturer products and systems, new construction, and low-energy retrofit projects. He is also the co-chair of the Thermal Bridging Working Group of the SEI Sustainability Committee, bringing awareness of thermal bridging to engineers in the industry.
 

Daniel Haaland, MASc, PEng

Principal, Building Science Engineer
RDH Building Science

As a Senior Building Science Engineer, Daniel Haaland, MASc, PEng, supports RDH’s core practice areas, including new construction, research, and sustainability, while also sharing his knowledge with the industry as an author, speaker, and guest lecturer. As the leader of RDH's advanced analytics team, Haaland helps teams to assess and meet their ambitions for energy-efficient and high-performance building designs. Recognized as a leader in the field of finite element analysis for construction, he has authored multiple related industry guidelines and standards, such as CSA Z5010 and the THERM Passive House Window Simulation procedure.

Adaptation of low-sloped roof assemblies against projected climate severities – Impact analysis of a new standard

3:05pm – 4:05pm

Sathya Ramachandran, Bruno Bernard

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/Elective. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Roofing: R, Sustainability/Resilience: SUS, Case Studies: CST


Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:
  • Recognize the designer’s responsibility and means to include the project-specific wind uplift requirements for low-slope roofs.
  • Describe existing challenges in meeting the current building code in resisting wind uplift and the required due diligence.
  • Explain the CSA A123.26 standard.
  • Discuss the potential effect of the new CSA A123.26 standard on the industry.

Description
The Ontario Building Code requires low-slope roof assemblies to withstand dynamic wind uplift according to the CSA A123.21 standard. This has had a major impact on the industry, obliging manufacturers to design, test, and determine the performance of complete roof assemblies. However, a recent project demonstrated a worst-case scenario: a series of errors involving a lack of site-specific wind values in the design specification, use of alternative methods of compliance presented by the manufacturer that were questionable, and poor quality of material handling and workmanship by the roofer during construction resulted in failure after strong wind events. As the industry tries to cope with these current requirements, the effects of climate change expose the built environment to more severe environmental stressors than what the code prescribes. Extreme weather events—including high wind speeds, intense rainstorms, heavy snowfalls, extended heat waves, and other stressors—are becoming more frequent and powerful. This session will discuss CSA A123.26, an optional standard that builds on CSA A123.21 in addressing the impacts of projected wind extremes and heavy rainfall. This presentation will also explore an evaluation of the CSA A123.26, which revealed some valuable lessons.

Presenter/Author

Sathya Ramachandran, Architect, OAA, MRAIC, BArch, MASc

Director – Building Science
EXP Services Inc.

Sathya Ramachandran has 24 years of experience in building science consulting and research, with a focus on such high-performance metrics as durability, resilience, energy conservation, and occupant comfort of building envelope assemblies. He has provided consulting services for various building types across North America and has advanced education in building science. He has strong knowledge, experience, and attention to detail in the areas of building science principles, material composition, regulations, different assemblies, and components. He is a voting member of the ASTM International E06 Committee for Performance of Buildings.
 

Bruno Bernard

Project Manager – Roof Testing Laboratory
EXP Services Inc.

Over his 30-year career, Bruno Bernard has developed an in-depth knowledge of roofing materials and their behaviour. Since 2016, he has headed the EXP roofing testing laboratory, the only laboratory recognized by UL DAP in Canada for the CSA A123.21 standard (Standard Test Method for Dynamic Wind Uplift Resistance of Membrane Roofing Systems). His duties include laboratory testing, in situ testing, and consulting expertise. He sits on the SIGDERS (Special Interest Group for the Dynamic Evaluation of Roofing System) committee and other related task groups.

 

Self-Adhered Membrane Applications: What Does It Really Mean to Stick?

4:30pm – 5:30pm

Cody Shelner, CABS, LEED Green Associate

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Exterior Wall: EW, Fenestration/Glazing: FG, Below Grade/Waterproofing: BGWP

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Identify the limitations of relying solely on peel adhesion tests for evaluating adhesive performance in self-adhered membranes.
  • Evaluate the importance of considering shear forces, temperature fluctuations, and external loads in the comprehensive evaluation of adhesives for self-adhered membranes.
  • Analyze the potential consequences of neglecting critical forces on adhesive performance, including reduced adhesion, membrane detachment, and compromised building envelope integrity.
  • Apply advancements in adhesive testing technology and methodologies to enhance the evaluation of adhesive performance, ensuring proper membrane adhesion and improving overall project performance.

Description
This session addresses the comprehensive evaluation of adhesives for self-adhered membranes in the construction industry. It recognizes that relying solely on peel adhesion tests overlooks critical forces that affect membrane performance. The session explores alternative evaluation methodologies, emphasizing the importance of considering shear forces, temperature fluctuations, and external loads. Neglecting these factors can lead to reduced adhesion, membrane detachment, and compromised building envelope integrity. Intended for construction professionals, architects, and engineers, the session showcases advancements in adhesive testing technology and methodologies. Attendees will gain insights into assessing adhesive performance and its implications for long-term project success. By incorporating these evaluation methods into the design and specification process, stakeholders can make informed decisions, ensure proper membrane adhesion, and enhance overall project performance. In summary, this session raises awareness about the limitations of relying solely on peel adhesion tests for self-adhered membranes. It highlights the need for a comprehensive evaluation of adhesives and consideration of all applied forces. By broadening the understanding of adhesive performance, attendees can improve the reliability and durability of self-adhered membrane systems, contributing to the sustainability and success of construction projects.

Presenter/Author

Cody Shelner, CABS, LEED Green Associate

Business Development Manager – Air and Waterproofing
Functional Coatings by tesa

Cody Shelner is an experienced expert in the pressure-sensitive adhesive and self-adhered membrane industry. With a background in mechanical engineering, Cody Shelner has contributed significantly to the development of adhesive technologies for self-adhered membranes. His expertise lies in evaluating and testing adhesives under various forces and environmental conditions. He actively participates in industry associations and committees, working toward establishing standards and best practices. Dedicated to advancing the industry, Cody Shelner continues to drive innovation and collaborate with leading manufacturers and professionals to shape the future of construction materials.
 

 

Tuesday, October 1

Modeling, Simulation, and Measurement of a Full-scale Integrated Energy Efficiency Retrofit Prototype for Single-Family Attached Residences in Cold Climates

10:15am – 11:15am

Shayan Mirzabeigi, LEED Green Associate and Sameeraa Soltanian-Zadeh

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Knowledge Level: Advanced
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/Elective. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Research & Technology: R&T, Exterior Wall: EW, Restoration: RS

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Identify and explain the key components of energy-efficient retrofitting technologies for residential buildings, with a focus on prefabricated panelized exterior insulated envelope systems.
  • Discuss the use of numerical tools for analyzing the hygrothermal performance of envelope retrofit assemblies by analyzing data from numerical simulations and field measurements, demonstrating competency in interpreting and applying results to real-world scenarios.
  • Assess the effectiveness of energy efficiency retrofitting measures in reducing energy use intensity, applying knowledge of relevant metrics and calculation methods to quantify potential energy savings accurately.
  • Develop actionable strategies for promoting the adoption of energy-efficient retrofitting technologies in residential buildings, incorporating principles of sustainability to reduce environmental impact and foster long-term energy conservation efforts.

Description
Building energy retrofitting has been acknowledged as a critical path for achieving energy and environmental targets. Prefabricated panelized exterior insulated envelope systems are emerging as a promising technology for retrofit solutions. However, there is a need to quantify panel performance relative to insulating value and airtightness. This case study investigates the use of numerical tools combined with in situ measurements to predict the performance of a full-scale integrated energy efficiency retrofit assembly installed at Syracuse University’s BEST facility. The study investigates the impact of air leakage on hygrothermal performance under varying pressure differentials, examining both infiltration and exfiltration using CHAMPS-BES. The effective R-value was measured for the retrofitted panel, including leakage and joint effects, and data was validated via field measurements. In the cold climate of Syracuse, NY, the retrofitting approach demonstrates a total 80.3% reduction in total thermal energy use intensity (EUI), including 8.3% reduction from the envelope retrofitting and 72% reduction from the mechanical pod. If fully adopted to multiple residential building types across the US, the approach could lead to significant CO2 emissions reduction associated with the potential energy savings of 531.05TWh/year.

Presenters/Authors

Shayan Mirzabeigi, LEED Green Associate

PhD Student/Research Assistant, Syracuse University

Shayan Mirzabeigi is currently a PhD candidate in sustainable construction management at SUNY ESF. He is also pursuing a second PhD in mechanical engineering at Syracuse University. He received his MS in building engineering from Politecnico di Milano, in 2020. His first degree was a bachelor’s degree from University of Tehran, in 2016. He has worked on several projects that include a diverse mixture of self-motivated, independent work as well as collaborative research. He has developed skillset and knowledge related to building energy performance, building envelope systems, and computer vision, which is being directly applied in his current research projects.
 

Sameeraa Soltanian-Zadeh

PhD Student/Research Assistant, Syracuse University

Sameeraa Soltanian-Zadeh is a third-year PhD student in mechanical and aerospace engineering at Syracuse University. She received her master's degree in building engineering from Politecnico di Milano and her bachelor’s degree in architectural engineering from University of Tehran. She is a recipient of the U.S. Department of Energy 2024 IBUILD Fellowship. Her research focuses on indoor air quality (IAQ) and urban environmental dynamics, highlighting occupant behavior's impact on IAQ and building energy efficiency. By examining diverse building types across different communities and income levels, her research contributes to environmental justice, offering insights for public health, energy efficiency, and sustainable urban development, especially regarding the role of building occupants.

Nonpresenting authors

Bess Krietemeyer, PhD

Associate Professor, Syracuse University

Bess Krietemeyer is an associate professor at the School of Architecture, Syracuse University. She brings experience in architectural design, deep energy retrofits, decision analysis tools, and academic-industry partnerships. Her research has been supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the National Science Foundation, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. Her current work includes leading a DOE Advanced Building Construction project to develop a holistic deep energy retrofit for LMI residences in cold climates. Additionally, she is working on projects through the DOE EPIC program focused on equity and health in grid-interactive and energy efficient buildings, the NREL Building America Program, and the NYSERDA Energy to Lead program focused on the energy and health benefits of deep energy retrofits.

Rui Zhang, PhD

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Dr. Rui Zhang works as a postdoctoral research associate in the Transportation Science and Buildings Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Zhang graduated from Syracuse University with a master's and doctorate in mechanical engineering. She focused on modeling computational fluid dynamics, indoor air quality, and building energy consumption throughout her MS. Later, she studied the impact of atmospheric corrosion on computer technology in data centers for her doctorate.  Dr. Zhang’s current research focuses on energy-efficient retrofit solutions for residential buildings, bio-based building materials, and building air leakage and moisture detectors. She also develops bio-based vacuum insulation panels.

Jianshun “Jensen” Zhang, PhD

Professor and Executive Director
Center of Excellence in Environmental and Energy Systems, Syracuse University

Dr. Jianshun “Jensen” Zhang is professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and executive director of SyracuseCoE at Syracuse University (SU) in Syracuse, New York.. He has over 30 years of research and teaching experience in Built Environmental Systems, with over 200 publications. His research ranges from multi-scale BES from nano/micro-scale in porous materials to buildings and urban environment, involving engineering, architectural design, and health and human performance. He served as US expert to several International Energy Agency Projects (IEA-EBC Annex 20, 68, 78, 86 and 92) in building energy efficiency and indoor air quality, and as president of International Association of Building Physics (2018-2021). Zhang is a fellow of ASHRAE and ISIAQ. He is the current editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Ventilation and associate editor of Science and Technology for the Built Environment.
 

Forward-Thinking Solar-Ready Commercial Roof Design

10:15am – 11:15am

John Karras, Samantha Corbel, Jacob Ringer

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Codes & Standards: C&S, Roofing: R

 

More details coming soon.

 

Windows Installation Designs for Meeting Demanding Thermal Code Requirements

11:20 a.m. – 12:20pm

John Straube, PhD, PEng

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/Elective. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Exterior Wall: EW, Fenestration/Glazing: FG,

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Explain how building codes are changing to require improved thermal performance by reducing thermal bridges.
  • Identify how the fundamental control layers maintain their continuity at the head and sill of typical windows.
  • Describe the limitations of common window buck solutions for window installation 
  • Identify how some newly available thermally improved materials and products can be used to make window installation thermally efficient as well as air- and water-tight.

Description
The building enclosure industry has been moving to the use of exterior continuous insulation for decades, and the thickness of the insulation required has steadily been increasing. Thicker exterior insulation requires new design solutions for cladding attachment and penetrations, such as window openings. Modern emerging building codes, such as the National Energy Code for Buildings 2020 in Canada and ASHRAE 90.1-2022 Energy Standard for Sites and Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, require the not-inconsiderable thermal bridging impact of window installation details to be considered. Finally, the need to focus on the water and airtightness of window installations is now widespread. New standards, such as CSA A440.6, High Exposure Fenestration Installation, provide requirements for demanding applications. This session will review design and construction challenges of window installation in walls with more than 50 mm (2”) of continuous insulation. New products have become available that may help solve some of the challenges. The design process, technology, and techniques for ensuring an air- and water-tight installation while mitigating thermal bridging will be presented, along with a range of thermal calculations and construction details to bring these solutions to life.

Presenter/Author

John Straube, PhD, PEng

RDH Building Science
University of Waterloo Faculty of Engineering
John Straube is a Principal at RDH Building Science and a cross-appointed faculty member in the School of Architecture and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Waterloo. He conducts forensic investigations, assists with the design of new high-performance buildings and building products and leads research projects in the areas of low-energy building design, building enclosure performance, hygrothermal analysis, and field performance monitoring.

Non-Presenting Author

Daniel Haaland, MASc, PEng

Principal, Building Science Engineer
RDH Building Science

As a Senior Building Science Engineer, Daniel Haaland, MASc, PEng, supports RDH’s core practice areas, including new construction, research, and sustainability, while also sharing his knowledge with the industry as an author, speaker, and guest lecturer. As the leader of RDH's advanced analytics team, Haaland helps teams to assess and meet their ambitions for energy-efficient and high-performance building designs. Recognized as a leader in the field of finite element analysis for construction, he has authored multiple related industry guidelines and standards, such as CSA Z5010 and the THERM Passive House Window Simulation procedure.

Understanding Spray Foam Shrinkage: History, Benefits, Cautionary Tales, and Constructability.

11:20 a.m. – 12:20pm

Zacharie Doerr

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/Elective. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Research & Technology: R&T, Exterior Wall: EW, Case Studies: CST

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Recognize the types of spray foam used in construction and how it compares to other insulation materials.
  • Summarize spray foam installation, quality assurance, and quality control processes in the construction industry.
  • Explain the importance of precise application techniques and limitations, detailing, and material selection to effectively mitigate these risks.
  • Discuss the impact of spray foam shrinkage on project implementation.

Description
This session will explore spray foam material types, physical properties, application methods, and significance in current construction practices. Following this, a historical narrative will trace the evolution of spray foam technologies, highlighting pivotal advancements and milestones shaping its present-day usage.  There are several benefits offered by spray foam insulation, including thermal efficiency, air sealing properties, and environmental friendliness. However, amidst its merits, cautionary tales emerge concerning spray foam’s susceptibility to shrinkage, effect on membrane adhesion, installation restrictions, and its ability to hide ongoing underlying failures. Real-world examples and case studies underscore the importance of precise application techniques and limitations, detailing, and material selection to effectively mitigate these risks. This session will address the practicality of using spray foam in confined spaces, discussing its suitability and associated considerations. By addressing these various aspects, this presentation will provide attendees with a comprehensive insight into the benefits of spray foam and its limitations, empowering installers and designers with essential knowledge for informed decision-making and successful project implementation.

Presenter/Author

Zacharie Doerr, PEng 

Senior Engineer
Engineering Link

As a senior project manager and engineer, Zacharie leads projects by performing investigations, completing designs, and attending and completing site reviews during construction. In addition to having a master’s degree in mechanical engineering, Doerr is a professionally licensed engineer with over 14 years of building science experience.
 

Achieving Building Envelope Durability Using CSA S478

2:00pm – 3:00pm

Gerald Genge, LL.M., P.Eng., BSS, ODACC Adjudicator

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Codes & Standards: C&S, Sustainability/Resilience: SUS

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Recognize that following the principles put forth in CSA S478 will reduce the risk associated with inadequate building envelope performance.
  • Explain how to employ CSA S478 in design and construction to achieve a durable building envelope.
  • Take the first steps in creating a durability plan for the life of the building to maintain the initial design objectives.
  • Discuss with the project team the benefits of employing a recognized standard for achieving the design and service life of building elements to manage risk, improve performance, and control unwarranted changes during construction.

Description
The premature expense of rehabilitating buildings has been an issue for decades. In 1994, CSA produced a guideline document to improve building durability. In 2019, that guideline was upgraded to a consensus standard that is ready to be adopted by the model National Building Code of Canada (NBCC). CSA S478 provides a process for developing durability in the envelope of buildings designed under Parts 3, 4, and 5 of the NBCC and regulations using the NBCC. It responds to the requirements of NBCC 5.1.5.2 to provide durable design by setting out a standard way to demonstrate through the design process how to make the relevant elements in the building envelope achieve a target durability level. The standard is supported by all sectors of the design industry, including design professionals, insurers, and contractors, each of whom seeks an accepted process for achieving a target durability level. This session will  highlight the processes set out by CSA S478 and the benefits to users.

Presenter/Author

Gerald Genge, LL.M., P.Eng., BSS, ODACC Adjudicator

Adjudicator/Mediator
Genge Construction Adjudication and Consulting

Jerry Genge is well known to persons in the building engineering community as president (twice) of OBEC and a contributor to the advancement of building technology. In 1999 he was awarded the “Beckie,” an OBEC award for the promotion of excellence in the design, construction, and performance of the building envelope. He was made a Fellow of OBEC and continues to contribute to monthly OBEC seminars. He is the past chair of CSA S478 Standard for Building Durability, the topic of his seminar, and wrote the initial white paper on the conversion of the guideline to a standard.

 

Examining Methods for Preserving and Improving the Energy Performance of Historic Aluminum Framed Curtainwall

2:00pm – 3:00pm

David Wach, PEng

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for AIA 1.0 LU/HSW. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Fenestration/Glazing, Sustainability/Resilience: SUS, Case Studies: CST

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Explain why historic curtainwall systems perform poorly compared to modern systems with respect to heat transfer.
  • Discuss the life-cycle analysis of glazing components and associated embodied energy.
  • Identify factors that impact a cost benefit analysis between retrofitting and replacing existing glazing systems.
  • Recognize how specific boundary conditions around existing glazing impact the practicality of replacement.

Description
With respect to thermal performance, historic aluminum-framed curtainwall systems perform poorly compared to modern counterparts.. These systems are ideal candidates for replacement with newer thermally efficient systems during building retrofits. However, there are situations where replacement of the curtainwall system is not feasible due to other factors such as historic significance, constructability, or excessive costs. When a facade is designated as historically significant by local preservation authorities, the appearance of the curtainwall system must be maintained. This may be difficult with modern replacement systems, and customization may be cost prohibitive.  This session explores a method that was developed to thermally retrofit in-situ a historic curtainwall framing system while maintaining the original appearance of the system. The change in thermal performance is modeled to estimate improvements that can be achieved through retrofitting existing framing and compared to the improvement in replacing the existing framing. Finally, an energy cost-benefit analysis is conducted to account for embodied energy associated with the new framing system. The primary intended audience is designers and constructors focused on building restoration. Some background knowledge of building science fundamentals will assist the attendee's understanding.

Presenter/Author

David Wach, PEng

Senior Engineer , Engineering Link Inc.

David Wach currently works at Engineering Link’s Toronto office in the building envelope department as a senior engineer. At Engineering Link, Wach leads consulting teams on both restoration and new construction projects. He is formerly of Architectural & Metal Systems in Ireland, where his work focused on glazing and cladding system development and product sustainability

Non-Presenting Authors

Arthur Li, PEng

Project Engineer, Engineering Link Inc.

Arthur Li is a project engineer at Engineering Link, with more than seven years of experience in building envelope design and restoration in new and existing buildings. He has a master’s degree in civil engineering from the University of Toronto and a bachelor’s degree of applied science in civil engineering from the University of Waterloo. Li brings his expertise in thermal modeling into the evaluation of existing and new building envelope assemblies.

Paul Pasqualini, MASc, PEng 

Partner/Director, Engineering Link Inc.

Paul Pasqualini brings over 25 years of expertise in building envelope engineering. His diverse portfolio spans all industry sectors, including new building design and the restoration and repair of existing facilities and heritage sites. He adopts a holistic design approach, leveraging his technical expertise in building materials and construction technology to address and resolve complex environmental and maintenance issues effectively.

Transforming 240 Markland Drive, Etobicoke: A Blueprint for Decarbonizing Multiunit Residential Buildings

3:05pm – 4:05pm

Blair Gamracy, RRO, BArch Sci and David De Rose, MASc, PEng, BSS

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Restoration: RS, Sustainability/Resilience: SUS, Case Studies: CST

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Explain the concept of decarbonization in the built environment and its role as a model for community revitalization and benchmark for emulation.
  • Discuss the pre-existing building envelope systems/condition, pre-existing and retrofitted performance parameters, and the evaluations required to upgrade performance of the presented case study building. 
  • Recognize the challenges involved with implementing new wall over-cladding, roof, and window/door systems within an occupied building.
  • Summarize the post-rehabilitation building performance, recognizing reductions in heating/cooling demands, energy consumption, and peak electrical demand. 

Description
Decarbonization within the built environment focuses on lowering greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) primarily through fuel switching building’s mechanical systems from fossil fuels to electric power.  The building envelope plays a significant role, as load reduction is often required to enable this change. This session explores 240 Markland Drive, Etobicoke, a 1960s building where deep retrofits to the existing building envelope were performed to optimize the building’s new mechanical systems.  The exterior masonry walls, windows, balcony slabs, roofs, joint sealants, and mechanical systems were in poor condition providing an opportunity for the developer to revitalize the existing building and provide a new rental building on the adjacent land. Both buildings are/will be heated and cooled by a ground source geothermal system. Wall over-cladding, roof assembly replacement, and window/door replacement significantly increased envelope thermal performance, decreasing heating and cooling demands, as well as reducing the number of boreholes required within the geothermal field. Peak electric demand was reduced as post retrofit utility bills show that energy consumption and peak electric demand dropped significantly compared to previous years.  This presentation will discuss 240 Markland’s sustainable design, demonstrating how future revitalization and development projects can help reduce the burden of the industry’s electrification movement on local infrastructure.

Presenters/Authors

Blair Gamracy, RRO, BArch Sci 

Project Director / Restoration Team Manager 
Synergy Partners Consulting Limited

With over 17 years of experience, Gamracy has worked on over 500 projects in new construction, building renewal, and enclosure design. A project director as well as restoration team manager, Gamracy serves as the president on the board of directors for the IIBEC Southern Ontario Chapter. 

In 2022, Gamracy received the Outstanding Committee Chair Award for the IIBEC Southern Ontario Chapter. He has been a guest lecturer at the University of Toronto and Toronto Metropolitan University, speaking on the topics of building enclosure restoration, retrofit, design and construction, building envelope materials, and building science.

David De Rose, MASc, PEng, BSS

Managing Principal / Project Director
Synergy Partners Consulting Limited

David De Rose has worked on over 500 projects over a 27-year career in building renewal and enclosure design. He is a member of Professional Engineers Ontario and is a certified Building Science Specialist (BSS). He is the chair of the CSA A440.6 subcommittee, which deals with high-exposure fenestration installation, and is a voting member for CSA-S478 Standard on Building Durability. He is currently a part-time professor at Toronto Metropolitan University, where he teaches building envelope restoration for the Master of Building Science Program. He is also a part-time professor at the University of Toronto where he delivers a course on building enclosures. He is a past president of the Ontario Building Envelope Council (2007 – 2008). In 2020, he was awarded with the Anthony A. Woods Career Achievement Award (The “Beckie”) for his significant contribution to the design, construction, and performance of the building envelope.
 

 

Portland Cement Pointing Mortar Contribution to Masonry Spalling

3:05pm – 4:05pm

Peter Meijer, AIA, NCARB, APT RP 

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Exterior Wall: EW, Restoration: RS, Case Studies: CST

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Differentiate between masonry failures due to freeze/thaw and due to salt migration from Portland cement pointing mortars.
  • Recognize the outward appearance of salt migration.
  • Discuss the selection of advanced laboratory tests for masonry analysis and identify material analysis testing including freeze/thaw, salt migration, and gas chromography.
  • Identify key material characteristics of older masonry and pointing mortars.
  • Recognize correct pointing mortars to use on older masonry structures.

Description
This session will explore detrimental issues resulting from the application of cement pointing mortars in older masonry buildings built from 1916 to 1930 that are susceptible to salt migration. Drawing from historic properties in the Pacific Northwest, the findings are based on research of historic documents, laboratory analysis, petrographic studies, comparative studies, and field documentation.  Often mistaken for freeze/ thaw due to similar near surface spalling, salt migration from cement pointing mortar into masonry capillaries causes surface spalling of older brick masonry with inherent cleavage planes. Corrective actions must first include petrographic analysis of Portland cement pointing mortar, salt residues, and original masonry units. In this session two case studies outlining methodologies for determining contribution of Portland cement salts in the spalling of masonry will be presented.  The authors will compare material composition and porosity of older masonry with new masonry properties. A distinction between salts within Portland cement and inherent salts in clay will be addressed. The target audience is holistic to the building industry and includes designers, architects, preservationists, researchers/academics, product manufacturers, contractors, building owners, local and federal governments, and municipal and city leaders.

Presenter/Author

Peter Meijer, AIA, NCARB, APT RP

Principal, Peter Meijer Architect PC

Peter Meijer is a principal at Peter Meijer Architect PC. He has over 30 years of professional experience, with an emphasis on the preservation and assessment of older, existing, and historic buildings. As a professional architect with a background in scientific research, he has developed his career with a focus on the unique building sciences associated with existing and historic resources. He has become a well-regarded expert on the diverse issues affecting older buildings both regionally and nationally.

Non-Presenting Author

Hali Knight

Associate / Designer, Peter Meijer Architect PC

Hali Knight has 10 years of professional experience, primarily with a focus on restoration and building enclosure design for existing and historic structures. While at Peter Meijer Architect PC (PMA), she has led many projects that include assessments and repair recommendations for historic materials such as masonry, slate, and terra cotta.  Many ofpmA’s projects utilize material testing and on-site evaluation as a means for building envelope repair methodologies and priorities. In addition to restoration work, she has worked on several large-scale renovation projects that include seismic upgrades and tenant improvements.

Validating Thermal Performance of Existing Assemblies Using In-Situ Measurements

4:30pm – 5:30pm

Shibei Huang, NFRC Certified Simulator

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Research & Technology: R&T, Exterior Wall: EW, Restoration: RS

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Explain the benefits of utilizing in-situ measurements during an existing building restoration or deep energy retrofit project.
  • Summarize the key steps of implementing sensors to measure assembly conductivity in the field.
  • Describe heat flux patterns of various measurement conditions in typical wall and roof assemblies.
  • Utilize strategies described in the session to improve the accuracy of thermal evaluation for existing assemblies.

Description
For architects, engineers, and building owners, the thermal performance of existing or historic building envelopes is often difficult to determine with a high level of accuracy. To obtain greater baseline performance accuracy for energy models, especially for deep energy retrofit projects, in-field measurement tools can be used to obtain real-time data on the conductivity of the existing assemblies. This presentation will focus on the typical procedures of in-situ U-factor measurement, outline the capabilities and limitations of the tool set, and recommend ways to improve the validity of measurements using case studies. For older buildings, the records of existing assemblies are often incomplete or inaccurate. The in-situ U-factor measurement tool set is especially useful for architects and engineers when the status of the existing materials is unclear. For a documented assembly, these field measurements assist in validating the U-factor estimates. If the field-measured U-factor consistently varies from the calculated prediction, those measurements prompt further study. For an undocumented envelope, field measurement is an excellent nondisruptive method for building owners and their consultants to estimate the thermal performance of an existing envelope. Every measurement is different due to key factors such as weather conditions, interior boundary, thermal mass, etc.

Presenter/Author

Shibei Huang, NFRC Certified Simulator

Building Enclosure Consultant, RWDI

A highly motivated building enclosure consultant with RWDI's Philadelphia team, Shibei Huang possesses technical skills specific to high-performance buildings, energy code compliance, assembly performance analysis, and construction administration. With a background in architecture design, Huang has extensive experience in institutional projects and across all project phases. Her analytical skills and knowledge of building science and historic preservation contribute to a deeper understanding of building performance and help inform building designs. She holds a BArch from the University of Oregon and an MSD in environmental building design from the University of Pennsylvania.
 

Engineering Tomorrow's Envelopes: Smart Blue Roofs Pioneering Sustainable Building Practices

4:30pm – 5:30pm

Jason Paulos, Sidney Picco, Sal Alejek

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Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Credits: This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH. | This session has been approved for 1.0 AIA LU/HSW. | 1 hour (60 min) of Education is eligible for 1 BSS Credit | 1 OAA Core Learning Hour | Session may qualify for PEEK CPD.
Session Topics(s): Roofing: R

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, the attendee will be able to:

  • Recognize and differentiate between Stormwater Detention Assemblies and Roof Integrated Design components in blue roof design.
  • Explain at regulatory requirements outlined in the National Building Code of Canada and National Plumbing Code of Canada regarding blue roof implementation.
  • Discuss at least two potential benefits of blue roofs in mitigating urban flooding and managing stormwater runoff.
  • Identify and explain the key differences between green and blue roofs.
  • Evaluate the feasibility of integrating blue roof systems and describe design considerations based on presented examples.

Description
As the frequency and intensity of stormwater-related events escalate globally due to climate change, urban areas face mounting challenges in managing excess water runoff. In response, blue roofs offer an innovative solution to this problem. While prolonged water exposure on roofing assemblies is typically avoided, blue roofs present a strategic approach to mitigating urban flooding by integrating building envelopes and smart technologies. This  intermediate-level presentation provides an overview of blue roof design, beginning with an exploration of the pressing stormwater challenges confronting municipalities. We delve into the concept of blue roofs and their potential benefits, emphasizing their role in urban flood mitigation. Drawing upon the National Building Code of Canada and Plumbing Code of Canada, we analyze the regulatory framework governing blue roof implementation. Through a detailed case study of the Credit Valley Conservation Authority Smart Blue Roof Project, we examine various facets of the design process, including membrane selection, concealed conditions issues, water depths, mechanical system integration, chlorine use, flow restrictors, and more. As one of the pioneering Smart Blue Roof projects in Canada, this presentation serves as a resource for engineers, architects, and policymakers seeking innovative strategies to address the pressing challenges of urban stormwater management using building envelope design.

Presenters/Authors

Jason Paulos, MBSc, LEED AP

Facade Project Manager
WSP Canada Inc.

Jason Paulos is an experienced project manager at WSP, with a strong background in the construction industry. With over 10 years of diverse experience, hehas made significant contributions in various sectors, including manufacturing, contracting, and consulting. He has undertaken projects in residential, institutional, commercial, and transportation divisions. He actively supports company-wide efforts to develop low-carbon solutions to enhance building envelope performance. He also plays a key role in WSP’s research and analysis of high-performance glazing systems.
 

Sal Alajek

Project Director
WSP Canada Inc.

Sal Alajek is a professional engineer and building sciences specialist at WSP Canada Inc. With a focus on existing building rehabilitation, his work encompasses building envelope, structure, and mechanical systems. His expertise extends to evaluating durability, energy efficiency, and occupant comfort implications in design and construction. He is a project director and has taken various leadership roles supporting the WSP National Technical Centres of Excellence.

Nonpresenting Author

 

Sidney Picco, BASc

Project Manager
WSP Canada Inc.

Sidney Picco is a project manager on the building sciences team at WSP. Her experience lies in roof restoration projects across residential, commercial, and healthcare sectors. She has a strong interest in roofing-related work, especially green and blue roofs. She is also experienced in conducting infrared thermographic scans of building envelopes and roofs, having earned her Level I Thermographer designation from the Infrared Training Center.